Switching Pixels

Leonie Whyte

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Angela Jackson

VISUAL EFFECTS PRODUCER

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As a graphic designer, Leonie Whyte works with images frequently actualized on paper, tactile and traditional.  She chose to team with Visual Effects Producer Angela Jackson-Betts who operates in a world of data, creating moving images only seen on a screen as a contained and set amount of coloured dots. This rendering of Goldie’s Ahinata Te Rangituatini is a literal example of how data on its own is meaningless, requiring context to make it of consequence.

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Tana & Julia entered the spirit of collaboration openly — not as client & contractor or musician & audience — but as two like-minded creatives. Their project stemmed from an ongoing conversation that spanned continents and time zones, forming a lengthy cyclic chinese-whisper. As the conversation played out, notions of distance, reflection and echo emerged; and ideas about how sound looks and how ideas sound developed. Employing Julia’s voice (formless) and Tana’s typography (form), the work presents a backward-looped recording that traverses a wall imaging its own sound in typographic form.

“You guys are twins aye!?
...don’t lie.”

Xanthe Harrison

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Anja Harrison

FASHION DESIGNER

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We aren’t. We look similar, we sound similar, we had the same upbringing, we both have creative jobs albeit in different industries and knew we wanted to work together to see what we could learn about ourselves. But we live on opposite sides of the world.

These circumstances provided the ‘why’ and the limitations on the ‘how’ we could collaborate. In our eyes a collaboration needed to be balanced between us, so that we had equal contributions. Because of our geographical distance we decided a conversation would be the most natural form of collaboration and could become the journey and the ‘something’ that we could make.

As proof of our conversations as collaboration we set out to record everything, so that nothing would be lost. Together we were building a space from the ideas we shared. This space was our cloud and the records of this could be used to map, by us or by others, what took place.
– The lamplighter talks to the Little Prince, while heralding morning and night.
– Virginia Woolf told us we needed to create a room of our own.
– Getting lost in translation between French and English.

However, now that those conversations exist in a time and place for us, it is the memory of the lightbulb moments where our two heads came together with the same ideas, that leave the most indelible trace. These traces have become more important to us than the actual conversations, as they symbolise the path we took along the way. They are the intersections, loops and motifs of our collaboration, like any train of thought.

Got Your Back

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The collaboration between Bevan & Davor saw their common love for purity, modernism and furniture all intermingle. What started out as a homage to the styles and processes they admire most turned into a deeper exploration of collaboration. Whilst, in a stylistic sense, their piece exemplifies the common ground they shared it is the physical object that represents the summation of two working together to become one.

Crowd Drawing

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Making something, design anything, with anybody, can be the chance to do nothing at all. Sometimes you start the process with an image in mind, sometimes with a creative partner, sometimes with a stranger. This project is a chance to collaborate with the crowd, whomever they may be.

Brogen Averill

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Jamie McLellan

PRODUCT DESIGNER

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Brogen and Jamie’s works explore the blur between function and aesthetics. Ultimately sculptural pieces, the designers were interested in creating works that ask the viewer to either beg reason for their existence or simply appreciate the works for their appearance.